Maui: Chow Fun with Governor David Ige

Governor David Ige on Maui

Governor David Ige and First Lady Dawn Amano-Ige spent time with Maui residents talking story about island issues such as Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Co., Maui County hospitals, and more. Read more on The Maui News

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Federal Funds: We are Starting to Make Progress

 

Governor David Ige addressing grassroots supporters at Moanalua High School. 

In some cases, the state has struggled to spend federal monies in a timely way.  This issue has vexed us for too long.  We are starting to make progress.

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Tax Modernization Program: On-time & On-Budget


We’ve also been working hard to implement expenditure control policies and create fiscal initiatives such as a tax modernization program.

While the history of the tax department’s computer programs is not a good one, the recent initiative to upgrade those programs is on time, on budget and meeting our first-year expectations.  It will take until 2018 to complete, but we are already seeing progress in the collection of the general excise and transient accommodation taxes

Photo: Todd Nacapuy, State of Hawaii CIO

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Managing Public Funds as a Public Trust

Governor David Ige with Sharon Moriwaki, PPC Associate Director at College of Social Sciences, UHM

 

Governing the right way also means managing public funds as a public trust.  That’s especially true when it comes to taking care of our debts and obligations.

The state’s obligation to the public pension and health benefit funds represent two of our biggest fixed expenses.  We need to find better ways to meet this challenge.  Their continued growth is a challenge that will remain with us for many years.  We must find ways to do better in meeting this challenge so as not to burden future generations of taxpayers.

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It Begins with Being Truthful

Photo Credit: Pono Media/Makaha Studios

Sugar is gone, as are many other aspects of the Hawaii we once knew.   In their place, however, there is an exciting new world beckoning us.  And that is what I want to talk about this morning—about this new world and the challenges we face as we govern—about doing things the right way to make things happen.

It begins with being truthful.  

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We Live in a Time of Extraordinary Change

Photo Credit: Pono Media/Makaha Studios

Today, we live in a time of extraordinary change, where the past seems to have little relevance to what is happening today, let alone tomorrow.  And while the past doesn’t provide us with a precise roadmap to the future, it does give us the very things we need to find our path:  values, sensibilities and the ways in which we treat each other—with aloha.

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STATE OF THE STATE ADDRESS GOVERNOR DAVID Y. IGE

 

STATE OF THE STATE ADDRESS
GOVERNOR DAVID Y. IGE
TO THE TWENTY-EIGHTH STATE LEGISLATURE
MEETING IN JOINT SESSION JANUARY 25, 2016

Speaker Souki, President Kouchi, former governors, distinguished justices of the courts, representatives of our congressional delegation, members of the Hawaii State Legislature, county mayors and other elected officials, honored guests, family and friends,

Good morning and aloha.

After Alexander & Baldwin announced the end of sugar production on Maui, I visited the people who work there.  Among them was a diesel mechanic, a fourth generation plantation worker, whose family history was interwoven with the sugar plantations.

He talked with pride about his work and life, and I shared that pride in recalling my own family’s life on the plantation.  I was also struck by the realization that his family’s future would forever be altered by the closure of sugar.

Like many of you here, I was saddened for those workers whose lives will be changed forever.
At the same time, I reflected on the challenges that we face moving forward.

Today, we live in a time of extraordinary change, where the past seems to have little relevance to what is happening today, let alone tomorrow.  And while the past doesn’t provide us with a precise roadmap to the future, it does give us the very things we need to find our path:  values, sensibilities and the ways in which we treat each other—with aloha.

Sugar is gone, as are many other aspects of the Hawaii we once knew.   In their place, however, there is an exciting new world beckoning us.  And that is what I want to talk about this morning—about this new world and the challenges we face as we govern—about doing things the right way to make things happen.

Read more
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